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How Hormones Work in the Body

 

“Hormones are our life force; the decline of hormones is the hallmark of aging. Without hormone replacement, we will end up mere shells of our former selves”

-Dr. Dan Hale

Testosterone is a vital male hormone that is responsible for the development and maintenance of male attributes. Women also have testosterone but in much smaller amounts. Testosterone stimulates the DNA in specific genes in the body to keep our genes healthy instead of going haywire. When things go haywire, they may lead to cancer, Alzheimer’s diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, decreased resistance to infections and arthritis.

Hormones influence the DNA of trillions of cells and genes. They stimulate DNA to produce proteins which are the building blocks for the human body. These proteins affect how we grow, our sexual traits, our brain functions, our strength, our circulations, our ability to fight infection and stress and even cancer. With the hormonal deficiencies of aging, our cells cannot function to maintain health.

The word hormone is derived from a Greek word that means “to set in motion.” Hormones pass through the blood stream communication messages from the brain to the DNA in each of the trillions of cells. The membranes of each cell have receptor sites that function as a lock to a door. Hormones are powerful chemical messengers that control vital organs in the body. In order for the hormone to enter into a cell to pass on the biochemical messages fro the brain, it has to unlock the receptor sites on specific “target cells”

As the hormone comes in contact with the target cells with its message from the brain, the hormone binds to the receptors sites. A particular site will respond only to a particular hormone “key” that “opens that particular door” to that cell. Once inside the cell, the hormone sets in motion the DNA in the cell to perform its functions-making more hormones or producing proteins.

If a target cell is a muscle, the hormone may cause the to relax or contract. Another target cell me be a gland. The hormone may cause that gland to produce a particular hormone (for example, estradiol or progesterone or testosterone) or it may cause the gland to stop producing such hormones.

You can see that these actions by a hormone secreted by the brain can have great effect over vital functions in the entire body.

The problem occurs when the target cells stop responding to the stimulus from the hormone secreted by the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. The target organs might be the testicles. When they stop responding the hormone “luteinizing hormone,” they cannot produce as much testosterone as they did 30 years ago. The result causes andropause in men.

The same is true with ovaries in women. When they cannot produce enough testosterone or progesterone or estradiol in response to follicle stimulating hormone, it causes the typical menopausal symptoms in women.

“Hormones are our life force; the decline of hormones is the hallmark of aging. Without hormone replacement, we will end up mere shells of our former selves”

     Testosterone is a vital male hormone that is responsible for the development and maintenance of male attributes. Women also have testosterone but in much smaller amounts. Testosterone stimulates the DNA in specific genes in the body to keep our genes healthy instead of going haywire. When things go haywire, they may lead to cancer, Alzheimer’s diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, decreased resistance to infections and arthritis.

Hormones influence the DNA of trillions of cells and genes. They stimulate DNA to produce proteins which are the building blocks for the human body. These proteins affect how we grow, our sexual traits, our brain functions, our strength, our circulations, our ability to fight infection and stress and even cancer. With the hormonal deficiencies of aging, our cells cannot function to maintain health.

The word hormone is derived from a Greek word that means “to set in motion.” Hormones pass through the blood stream communication messages from the brain to the DNA in each of the trillions of cells. The membranes of each cell have receptor sites that function as a lock to a door. Hormones are powerful chemical messengers that control vital organs in the body. In order for the hormone to enter into a cell to pass on the biochemical messages fro the brain, it has to unlock the receptor sites on specific “target cells”

As the hormone comes in contact with the target cells with its message from the brain, the hormone binds to the receptors sites. A particular site will respond only to a particular hormone “key” that “opens that particular door” to that cell. Once inside the cell, the hormone sets in motion the DNA in the cell to perform its functions-making more hormones or producing proteins.

If a target cell is a muscle, the hormone may cause the to relax or contract. Another target cell me be a gland. The hormone may cause that gland to produce a particular hormone (for example, estradiol or progesterone or testosterone) or it may cause the gland to stop producing such hormones.

You can see that these actions by a hormone secreted by the brain can have great effect over vital functions in the entire boys.

The problem occurs when the target cells stop responding to the stimulus from the hormone secreted by the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. The target organs might be the testicles. When they stop responding the hormone “luteinizing hormone,” they cannot produce as much testosterone as they did 30 years ago. The result causes andropause in men.

The same is true with ovaries in women. When they cannot produce enough testosterone or progesterone or estradiol in response to follicle stimulating hormone, it causes the typical menopausal symptoms in women.

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